Recent Storm Damage Posts

Simple Tips to Keep Ahead of Summertime Storms

5/28/2019 (Permalink)

Summertime in Kentucky brings fun, sun and lots of time on the lake but it can also bring some pretty strong storms. Here at SERVPRO of Marion, Adair & Russell Counties we want to make sure you stay prepared for these storms so you can keep your family safe. 

Before the Storm

  • Build an emergency supply kit and make sure you have a communication plan.
  • Unplug any electronic equipment.
  • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.
  • If you are outdoors, get inside a building, home or hard top vehicle. 
  • Shutter windows and secure outside doors. If shutters are not available, close window blinds, shades or curtains.

During the Storm

  • Use your battery-operated NOAA Weather Radio for updates.
  • Avoid contact with corded phones. Cordless/cellular phones are safe to use but it's a good idea to store a battery-operated phone charger in case power is out for a while.
  • Avoid contact with electrical equipment or cords.
  • Stay away from windows and doors.
  • Unplug appliances and electrical items, like computers. Power surges from lightning can cause serious damage.
  • Avoid contact with plumbing. Plumbing and bathroom fixtures can conduct electricity.

After the Storm

  • Never drive through a flooded roadway.
  • Stay away from storm-damaged areas to keep from putting yourself at risk from the effects of severe thunderstorms.
  • Stay away from downed power lines and report them immediately.

Ways to Help a Storm Ravaged Community

5/28/2019 (Permalink)

With hurricane and tornado season approaching, it's a great time to prepare for storms. Whether your area is impacted or somewhere else, we can all band together and put everyone's lives back "Like it never even happened". 

At SERVPRO of Marion, Adair & Russell Counties,  our sense of community extends far beyond just Kentucky. In times of need we have been to many other areas to do our part to help them recover.

These products are easily attainable and always appreciated after a major storm event. 

There's no need to run right out and buy everything listed here. But, if everyone bought even a few, we could all be ready to put our communities back together or help a neighbor!

Non – Perishable Food Items

Manual Can-Openers

Plastic Food Containers

Zip-Lock Bags

Easy Open/Pop-Top Foods

Snack Foods

Bottled Water or Gallons of Water

Healthy Juices

Gatorade

Plastic Service Products (Plates/Cups/Cutlery/Etc.)

Baby Supplies

Diapers/Wipes

Personal Care Items

Infant/Baby Formula

Personal Care

Toothbrushes/Toothpaste

Deodorants/Shampoos/Soaps

Combs/Brushes

Adult Diapers/Depends

Feminine Hygiene Items

First Aid Kits

Antibacterial Wipes of Hand Sanitizer

Shelter Supplies

Tarps/Work Gloves

Batteries/Flashlights

Emergency Candles

Clotheslines/Pins

Plastic Totes w/Lids

Pet Supplies

Food – Cans/Bags

Litter/Collars/Leashes

Household Items

Cleaning Supplies

Mops/Brooms/Dust Pans

Paper Products

Laundry Detergent

Rakes/Shovels

Trash Bags - All Sizes

Any items you collect for donation can be taken to non-profits such as the Red Cross or local groups. Typically these donations are tax deductible. 

Should a weather event impact our area leaving you with any storm damage, water damage, fire damage or mold, give your specially-trained team at SERVPRO of Marion, Adair & Russell Counties a call. We're always just a phone call away at (270) 402-8170. 

Signs That Your Roof Has Sustained Storm Damage

5/22/2019 (Permalink)

After a storm it's not always immediately apparent whether or not your roof has sustained damage. These tips are not comprehensive but they are a quick, simple guide to determining the probability that your roof may be setting you up for water damage inside your home.

Loss of Granules on Shingles

Shingles are covered in granules. These granules protect the surface of your home from UV rays and inclement weather. If you notice granules in your downspout or around your home it may be a sign that your shingles need replacing. 

Hail Damaged Shingles

Shingles should be inspected for damage after a storm has occurred. Dents, lifting, bruises, broken edges and other damage may not be immediately apparent from the ground. 

Dented Gutters and Flashing

Gutter and/or flashing damage could indicate the possibility of roof damage as well. If gutters or flashing is dented and/or damaged, the possibility of roof damage should be considered as well. 

What You Should and Shouldn't Do When a Flood Occurs

5/22/2019 (Permalink)

What To Do After Flooding

  • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
  • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
  • Remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
  • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place.
  • Gather loose items from floors.

What NOT To Do After Flooding

  • Don't leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
  • Don't leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
  • Don't use your household vacuum to remove water.
  • Don't use television or other household appliances.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet, and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging.

Are You Prepared for a Power Outage?

5/21/2019 (Permalink)

Warmer weather often brings stronger storms to Kentucky. Extended power outages may impact your home and even whole community. A power outage is when the electricity goes out unexpectedly. A power outage may:

  • Disrupt communications, water, transportation and other emergency services.
  • Close retail businesses, grocery stores, gas stations, ATMs, banks, and other services.

  • Cause food spoilage and water contamination.

  • Prevent the use of medical devices.

PROTECT YOURSELF DURING A POWER OUTAGE:

  • Keep freezers and refrigerators closed to keep what cooler air is left inside contained.

  • Only use generators outdoors and away from windows.

  • Do not use a gas stove to heat your home.

  • Disconnect appliances and electronics to avoid damage from electrical surges.

  • Have alternate plans for refrigerating medicines or using power-dependent medical devices.

  • If safe, go to an alternate location for heat or cooling.

  • Check on neighbors. Especially those that are elderly, young and/or live alone. 

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A POWER OUTAGE THREATENS: 

Prepare NOW

  • Take an inventory of the items you need that rely on electricity.
  • Talk to your medical provider about a power outage plan for medical devices powered by electricity and refrigerated medicines. Know how long medication can be stored at higher temperatures and get specific guidance for any medications that are critical for life.
  • Stock batteries and other alternatives to meet your needs when the power goes out.
  • Sign up for local alerts and warning systems and monitor weather reports.
  • Install carbon monoxide detectors with battery backup in central locations on every level of your home.
  • Determine whether your home phone will work in a power outage and how long battery backup will last.
  • Review the supplies that are available in case of a power outage. Have flashlights with extra batteries for every household member. Have enough nonperishable food and water.
  • Use a thermometer in the refrigerator and freezer so that you can know the temperature when the power is restored. Throw out food if the temperature is 40 degrees or higher.
  • Keep mobile phones and other electric equipment charged and gas tanks full.

https://www.ready.gov/power-outages

What To Do Before, During and After a Major Storm Event

5/21/2019 (Permalink)

Severe weather can cause damage to your home, property or business. Your first priority is to stay safe during the storm.  When the storm is over, call the restoration pros of SERVPRO of Marion, Adair & Russell Counties. 

Here's what FEMA says about floods:

Flooding happens during heavy rains, when rivers overflow, when ocean waves come onshore, when snow melts too fast, or when dams or levees break. This is the most common natural-weather event. Flooding may be only a few inches of water or it may cover a house to the rooftop. Floods that happen very quickly are called flash floods.

Before a storm

  • Build an emergency kit.
  • Make a family communication plan.
  • Inform other family members and/or neighbors if you hear a flood warning on the TV or radio. This allows everyone to prepare themselves. Communicate the importance of staying near an adult to children. 

During

  • Listen to authorities and safety officials.
  • If there's any possibility of a flash flood, move immediately to higher ground. 
  • Help your family move important items to an upper floor if there's time. 
  • Do not walk through moving water. Even 6” of water can make you fall.
  • Ensure that everyone stays together. 

After

  • Account for everyone and continue to stay together. This is especially true in the event that aid and/or rescue is needed.
  • Stay away from flood water. It could be contaminated, meaning contain dangerous substances.
  • Stay away from moving water. It can knock you off your feet and carry you downstream or cause injury or drowning.
  • Stay out of the way of emergency workers so they can do their job easily.
  • Call in professionals to aid in remediating  damage. Flood waters can be contaminated and cause further concerns such as mold. Special equipment may also be needed to mitigate and remediate damage. 

Professional Storm Restoration Services Provide the Best Solution

5/22/2018 (Permalink)

Natural disasters can happen fast. Even if storms or other weather events are expected, storms can suddenly change course and become worse than projected. They can leave things like hurricane damage, excess ground water, flood water from river flooding, hail damage, frozen pipes, ice damming and ice damage behind.

When there is storm damage that includes wind damage, flooding, roof damage, a roof leak requiring roof repair, and water damage to your home or business you need the professional services of experts in storm restoration. The faster you get expert help with wind or water damage, the less permanent destruction you'll see.


Professional Help is Best


It's always best to hire experts in storm restoration when the unthinkable has happened. They can remove flood water and dirty ground water thoroughly. They know how to extract water fast with professional water removal using drying equipment, before standing water can create more damage from mold and mildew. Water restoration is a complicated process.

Professionals get businesses or homes dry again by using proven water restoration techniques. They'll sanitize and deodorize areas that have experienced flooding, whether it resulted from hurricane damage, river flooding or tornado damage. Professionals use special sensing equipment to find hidden water damage behind ceilings or walls. Storm restoration is something you never want to tackle on your own. It needs to be done right.


Steps Behind Water Extraction


When you call water restoration experts, the first step they'll take is to come to the home or business to evaluate the extent of water damage. Since they've seen the damage that comes from flood water, ground water, hurricane damage and storm damage, they have experience that helps them to know exactly what methods will be best for your storm remediation. Here are some of the steps they'll take:


- Water Removal - The first thing professionals do is remove the water quickly. Using specially designed flood pump technology and industrial strength wet and dry vacuum equipment, thorough home restoration will soon be underway. In cases of river flooding or damage by other types of standing water, after a flood pump is used, the water is evaluated for levels of bacteria and put into a category.

- Professional Drying - Professional, industrial grade dryers are used in water restoration service. After flood pumps have removed water, it's crucial to begin the drying process. Even when things look dry to the touch, they can still be wet. Specialty blowers are used to create airflow across previously flooded surfaces.

- De-humidification - A special complementary service to drying makes sure water is thoroughly removed from drywall and other building materials. Experts in storm restoration use specially designed meters to track the drying progress to be sure you get the most effective storm remediation.

- Cleanup and Sanitizing - After water is removed with a flood pump and other equipment, a critical part of your total home restoration is to have the area professionally cleaned and sanitized. River flooding and flooding due to hurricane damage or other storm damage features ground water and flood water that can be filled with bacteria or potentially dangerous organisms. Sanitizing after storm damage is an important part of storm remediation.


Winter Storms Create More Challenges


Winter storms like blizzards and whiteout situations can create ice damming, frozen pipes, hail damage, ice damage, wind damage and other problems making home restoration a challenge. There may be denting from hail damage, ice dam formation, frozen pipes, roof damage, severe ice damming, wind damage and damage from a roof leak requiring roof repair. These situations call for professional storm remediation. Frozen pipes require specialized treatment to thaw. Roof damage with a roof leak needs to be assessed so problem areas can be fixed correctly.

In an ice dam situation, shingles and gutters can be permanently damaged if it isn't corrected early. Ice damming left unchecked can lead to further flooding or roof leak scenarios leading to expensive roof repair situations. Wind damage, hail damage, ice dam events and ice damage can be incredibly destructive. Ice damage including an ice dam can lead to roof damage needing roof repair due to excessive weight. Professional home restoration is always the smart choice.

Best Tips for Getting Rid of Bad Smells After Flooding

5/22/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Best Tips for Getting Rid of Bad Smells After Flooding Drying system in use after flood damage.

Flood water can leave your home with a funky smell. Whether the flood introduced mold growth or caused a sewer backup, you don't want to let the bad smell linger in your home any longer than necessary. It can be hard to completely remove the odors on your own. After all, it could take some high-quality equipment to really rid your home of the aromas. When you want to do more than cover up a funky odor, you need to turn to water and storm damage remediation experts. Consider these tips as the professionals get to work:

• Find the Source: Bed smells usually have a source. When you find the source, such as sewage loss or mold growth, you can address the problem better.
• Get Rid of Water: Before you can really take care of the scent problem, you need to make sure the water issue is cleared up. Removing excess water from your home can also help you avoid further damage.
• Disinfect the Area: Using a powerful cleaner can help you kill the fungus or bacteria causing the smells. If you don't clean the area, you may only end up covering up the unwelcoming odors.
• Deodorize the Area: After a thorough cleaning, you can start the deodorization process. Your cleanup team may want to spray the area directly.
• Deodorize the Air: Because scents can waft throughout a home, you may also need to use a mixture to absorb the smells from the air. You may be able to use items you have on hand, such as cat litter, vinegar or baking soda, to freshen the air.

Flood water can cause a lot of issues in your home. After the waters have been cleaned up, you may notice a lingering aroma. This could be due to mold growth or dirty water. With a little bit of work and some help, you can get rid of the bad smells.

Be Ice Storm Ready

5/17/2018 (Permalink)

Whether there is heavy rain, freezing temperatures, damaging winds, or sleet and snow; all of these can cause property damage. You can't control Mother Nature but you can be prepared so here are some tips to help you:

-Check for tree limbs and branches that might have fallen.

-Roofs, pipes and gutters should all be inspected and make sure they are in proper working order. Clear gutters from debris, a damming effect could cause roof damage or interior water problems. Downspouts should be facing away from the home or building.

-Clean your chimneys and exhaust systems from debris.

-Test your gas lines for leaks.

-Inspect your property for proper drainage.

-Protect pipes from freezing by allowing water to drip when temperatures dip below freezing. If any pipes are under cabinets leave the cabinets open. Make sure exterior pipes are properly insulated.

-If there are any outdoor faucets, you might want to shut the water off.

-Make sure all exterior doors and windows have sufficient weather stripping.

Do you have an ERP for your business? Ask your SERVPRO Sales and Marketing Representative

SERVPRO Storm Teams

5/17/2018 (Permalink)

As we all know, almost everyone has been touched by a weather event in the U.S. over the past few years. Sometimes we know a storm is coming and we prepare the best we can and it still isn’t enough. Neighborhoods, cities, towns and even states are displaced by storms. All resources are stretched to the breaking point including shelter, food, and water. These are just the basic of necessities that are hard to take care immediately following a devastated storm. We at SERVPRO have teams all over the country who are called Storm Teams. These Storm Teams have the equipment, manpower and knowledge to hit the ground running to help clean up and restore after a disaster. Our corporate office does a great job of dispatching our Storm Teams to right place so that we can help communities get back on their feet. SERVPRO works with the people, insurance companies and authorities to get the area back to normal as quickly as possible. When you see the next storm headed to a city rest assured SERVPRO is ready to respond where we are needed.

What To Do During A Flood

5/17/2018 (Permalink)

Staying Safe Indoors
  • Turn off the power and water mains if instructed to do so by local authorities.
  • Boil tap water until water sources have been declared safe.
  • Avoid contact with floodwater. It may be contaminated with sewage or contain dangerous insects or animals.
  • Continue listening to local area radio, NOAA radio or TV stations for the latest information and updates.
  • Don’t use gas or electrical appliances that have been flooded.
  • Dispose of any food that comes into contact with flood water .
Staying Safe Outdoors
  • Don't walk, swim or drive through floodwater. Just six inches of fast-flowing water can knock you over and two feet will float a car.
  • If caught on a flooded road with rapidly rising waters, get out of the car quickly and move to higher ground.
  • Don't walk on beaches or riverbanks.
  • Don’t allow children to play in or near flood water.
  • Avoid contact with floodwater. It may be contaminated with sewage or contain dangerous insects or animals.
  • Stay out of areas subject to flooding. Underpasses, dips, low spots, canyons, washes, etc. can become filled with water.

Article from redcross.org 

Make Sure To Be Prepared. Have A Survival Kit!

5/17/2018 (Permalink)

Being prepared means being equipped with the proper supplies you may need in the event of an emergency or disaster. Keep your supplies in an easy-to-carry emergency preparedness kit that you can use at home or take with you in case you must evacuate.

At a minimum, you should have the basic supplies listed below:

  • Water: one gallon per person, per day (3-day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home)
  • Food: non-perishable, easy-to-prepare items (3-day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home).
  • Flashlight [Available on the Red Cross Store]
  • Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible) [Available on the Red Cross Store]
  • Extra batteries
  • First aid kit [Available on the Red Cross Store]
  • Medications (7-day supply) and medical items
  • Multi-purpose tool
  • Sanitation and personal hygiene items
  • Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, insurance policies)
  • Cell phone with chargers
  • Family and emergency contact information
  • Extra cash
  • Emergency blanket [Available on the Red Cross Store]
  • Map(s) of the area

Consider the needs of all family members and add supplies to your kit. Suggested items to help meet additional needs are:

  • Medical supplies (hearing aids with extra batteries, glasses, contact lenses, syringes, etc)
  • Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)
  • Games and activities for children
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)
  • Two-way radios
  • Extra set of car keys and house keys
  • Manual can opener

Additional supplies to keep at home or in your survival kit based on the types of disasters common to your area:

  • Whistle
  • N95 or surgical masks
  • Matches
  • Rain gear
  • Towels
  • Work gloves
  • Tools/supplies for securing your home
  • Extra clothing, hat and sturdy shoes
  • Plastic sheeting
  • Duct tape
  • Scissors
  • Household liquid bleach
  • Entertainment items
  • Blankets or sleeping bags

Click here for more information - Red Cross Survival Kit